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20130117
20130117
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
there would be a method. explain. >> well, actually, the public option would decrease the deficit by about $104 billion over ten years. >> how too you know that? >> that's the congressional budget office estimate. of what it would do. this is not numbers i made up. because it would inn fact lower the -- provide an option -- this would be completely by choice -- for people who don't want to pick this public option, among the private sector choices within a health exchange, and rates for premiums are estimated to be about 5 to 7% lower, meaning those people in the exchange that needed a subsidy would take fewer tax dollars and it is also estimated that it would serve as an anchor, because there's competition, to bring down the cost of health care, even in the private sector as well. >> when is the government -- when is the government ever done that? with george bush's plan, you were critical and had a right to be for prescription drug benefit. the argument ises that it would drive down the cost of those drugs. if anything they have soared since that benefit came in because the government can
fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next day-to-day. jon: so what about that statement from the president, true or false? a fact check on that and a bunch of others. we'll have the answers for you coming up. jon: right now lawmakers are working on a strategy to try to keep the government running. they only have about 4-6 weeks left before the nation hits the national debt ceiling. republicans are calling for budge cuts in return for raising the debt ceiling, but president obama came out swinging during his news conference on monday claiming he's already gone a long way toward closing the budget gap. joining us now to fact check some of his statements, stephen hayes, a senior writer for the weekly standard and a fox news contributor, douglas holtz-eakin is now president of the american action forum. just as a general rule, steven, when you heard the president speaking in that news conference, was he generally being honest with the american people about
it himself. what i'm told is that we can expect to touch as you might expect on deficits and debt. on immigration and gun control. but he is also going to address our seemingly broken politics. you have to remember the inaugural address is part of a large day of events and the people who are organizing it well placed democrats tell me that they are trying to make sure that one appeared, including the president. no one appears to be spiking the football. they don't want people watching at home as one democrat said to me to get the idea that oh, he, meaning the president, is having a big party while the rest of us are still mired in a financial crisis, bill. >> bill: yeah. they are even having trouble filling the party. the address is monday night. we will be live on the factor. we have a really good lineup. i have seen a change in the demeanor as i said to senator rubio of president obama. is he a little more in your face than he was before the election. just real quick, rosen, you have seen that change? >> yeah. and i think the nomination of chuck hagel shows it. >> bill: okay. no
is more than simply deficit reduction, they are suspicious about government commitment to make sure that seniors have decent health care and whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat. that's an outrageous statement to begin with. on top of that that's not exactly a great way to forge bipartisan consensus. it o it's one thing to question your opponent's policies and another to question their motives. and he's not interested in forging bipartisan consensus on the debt, he's interesting in demonizing and dividing republicans and he's going to continue to do that in his second term. >> megyn: why would he be doing that, simon? >> i think it's called politics, megyn. i think what we expect out of our president, just like we expect out the republican party, is for them to fight as hard as they can for the things that they believe in. and to be -- and to make clear about what they believe the other side is doing, too. listen, i listened to rick santorum at the republican convention say that if barack obama is reelected it will be the end of the repu
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)